The Center for Human-Computer Interaction is an interdisciplinary research center jointly sponsored by the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology; and the Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science at Virginia Tech.

Archived News 2017

Congratulations to Panagiotis Apostolellis on successful PhD defense

2017-03-16

Congratulations to Panagiotis Apostolellis on the successful defense of his Ph.D. dissertation entitled "Evaluating Group Interaction and Engagement using Virtual Environments and Serious Games for Student Audiences in Informal Learning Settings". His advisor is Doug Bowman, with committee members Chris North, Todd Ogle (TLOS), Manuel Perez-Quinones (UNC, former CS faculty), and Marjee Chmiel (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, former Associate Director of Curriculum and Communications at the Smithsonian Science Education Center).

CHCI welcomes new member Brook Kennedy

2017-03-16

Brook Kennedy is an Associate Professor in the Industrial Design program with a career spanning 15 years in Industrial, Interaction and Communication design consulting. He received a BA in Art from Reed College in Portland, Oregon and an MFA at Stanford University from the Joint Program in Design. You can find more info about Brook here.

CHCI faculty Kurt Luther receives NIH grant

2017-02-22

Kurt Luther and T.M. Murali, both researchers in the College of Engineering’s Department of Computer Science, recently received funding to begin tracking the effects of everyday chemical pollutants on human cells by depicting clear relationships between protein-based cell networks and their disruptors using crowdsourced visual graphs. The project is funded by the National Institutes of Health through its "Big Data to Knowledge" initiative. More information on the VT News article.

CHCI welcomes new member Jeff Joiner

2017-01-16

Jeff Joiner is an Assistant Professor of Practice and the Director of FourDesign, the student-run, faculty-led design studio at Virginia Tech. He received his MFA in Design with a Concentration in Design Research from the University of North Texas in Denton, TX. He has also taught in the design departments at both UNT and at Texas State University in San Marcos, TX. You can find more about him here and his design work at The Rocket Lab and FOURDESIGN.

CHCI welcomes new member Patrick Finley

2017-01-12

Patrick Finley is an interactive designer and design educator who maintains a practice centered around research, teaching and service. His design work has been showcased at national and international competitions. He regularly conducts presentations and workshops at conferences throughout the country, most notably at AIGA and UCDA. Patrick’s current work, FitHub, is a fitness app for the Android and iPhone platforms that acts as a hub to all wearable fitness devices. The app leverages gamification by encouraging users to track fitness based statistics and compete against friends in challenges. Currently on its third version, FitHub received the Google Developer Award “Best of Show” in the fitness category and has over 37,000 downloads to date. Patrick earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design, minoring in Computer Science, from the University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire and a Master of Fine Arts in Graphic Design, with an emphasis in Human Computer Interaction, from Iowa State University. Welcome Partick!

Dr. Kurt Luther (PI) and Dr. Chris North (Co-PI) receive NSF Award

2017-01-10

The title of the proposal is "Supporting Crowdsourced Sensemaking in Big Data with Dynamic Context Slices" and it was awarded $500,000 over three years. This research will investigate how crowdsourcing and computational techniques can be combined to support the efforts of an individual analyst engaged in a complex sensemaking task, such as identifying a threat to national security or determining the names of people and places in a photograph. Check out the NSF Award Abstract.The title of the proposal is "Supporting Crowdsourced Sensemaking in Big Data with Dynamic Context Slices" and it was awarded $500,000 over three years. This research will investigate how crowdsourcing and computational techniques can be combined to support the efforts of an individual analyst engaged in a complex sensemaking task, such as identifying a threat to national security or determining the names of people and places in a photograph. Check out the NSF Award Abstract.

Congratulations to Mahdi Nabiyouni of successful PhD defense

2017-01-07

Congratulations to Mahdi Nabiyouni on the successful defense of his PhD dissertation entitled "How Does Interaction Fidelity Influence User Experience in VR Locomotion?”. His advisor is Doug Bowman, co-advisor Tobias Hollerer (UCSB) and committee members Chris North, Denis Gracanin, and Nicholas Polys.

Archived News 2016

CHCI welcomes new member Meaghan Dee

2016-12-12

Meaghan Dee is the Chair of Visual Communication Design Program in the School of Visual Arts at Virginia Tech. Meaghan received her BFA in Graphic Design from University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and her MFA in Design from Virginia Commonwealth University. Prior to joining Virginia Tech, she worked professionally as a designer for the Architecture and Design firm, Marnell Companies, where she regularly collaborated with Architects, Interior Designers, and Industrial Designers on large-scale resorts. Meaghan's design focus is on branding, typography, editorial design, user experience, and packaging. She regularly collaborates on Freelance Design projects and Grant research. Her work has been awarded nationally and internationally by the American Advertising Federation, the American Institute of Graphic Artists, Graphic Design U.S.A., Graphis, and Hiii Typography. More about Meaghan on her personal website. Welcome Meaghan!

CHCI's presence at the Science Museum during VT Science Festival

2016-10-05

PhD student Panagiotis Apostolellis represented the CHCI with his work on Collaborative Orchestrated Learning in Virtual Environments (C-OLiVE), during the Virginia Tech Science Festival - School Preview Day, on Friday 10/5/16. Panagiotis set up a small auditorium outside of the Planetarium of the Science Museum of Western Virginia (SMWV) in Roanoke and had visiting school groups interact with his unique multi-player game. The game is teaching the process and the mechanics involved in the production of olive oil, using a custom virtual environment - simulation game, where student groups can play together using Xbox controllers and iPads. The game was specifically developed for informal learning settings and will be also presented at the VT Science Festival on campus on Saturday, October 8th. More information about this project can be found here.

CHCI welcomes new member Gang Wang

2016-08-30

The Center for HCI is pleased to welcome its newest member, Dr Gang Wang. Gang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and his research covers a range of topics of Cyber Security, Internet Measurement, Mobile Networks, and HCI, mostly from data-driven perspectives. More info about Gang on his personal website. Welcome Gang!

Edward Fox receives XCaliber Award

2016-08-23

Edward A. Fox, professor of Computer Science and CHCI faculty, has received the university’s 2016 XCaliber Award for making extraordinary contributions to technology enriched active learning. Established in 1996 by the Office of the Provost, the XCaliber Award is present annually by Technology-enhanced Learning and Online Strategies to recognize individual faculty members or teams of faculty and staff who integrate technology in teaching and learning. More information here.

NSF grant for transforming VT's ECE department awarded to CHCI faculty

2016-07-19

Congratulations to Ben Knapp, Tom Martin (co-PI's), Steve Harrison (senior personnel), and Luke Lester for their NSF award for the amount of $2,000,000 for 5 years. The project titled "Radically Re-designing the Fan-in and Fan-out of an Electrical and Computer Engineering Department" aims to transform Virginia Tech's Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering from a department with narrow curricular paths that attracts and produces traditional engineers to one that draws and retains a wider pool of students and prepares them to be T-shaped professionals for a range of careers. More information on the NSF award website.

Congratulations to Ayshwarya Saktheeswaran on successful Masters defense

2016-07-08

Congratulations to Ayshwarya Saktheeswaran on the successful defense of her Masters Thesis entitled "The Role of Teaching Assistants in Introductory Programming Courses”. Her advisor is Steven Harrison and committee members Deborah Tatar and Stephen Edwards.

Doug Bowman named Frank J. Maher Professor

2016-06-28

Doug Bowman, professor of computer science in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been awarded the Frank J. Maher Professorship in Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors. A member of the Virginia Tech faculty since 1999 and director of the Center for Human-Computer Interaction since 2011, Bowman is a world leader in research in 3-D interfaces for computers and virtual reality, with a wide range of uses in education and training, the arts, science, and urban design. More information here.

Prof. Reza Barkhi recognized as scholar of the week

2016-06-03

The Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation recognizes Reza Barkhi, a professor and head of the department of accounting and information systems in the Pamplin College of Business, for his research in collaborative technologies and team problem-solving. Barkhi is interested in Group Decision Support Systems, which are computer-based systems that help a team of decision-makers solve problems and make choices, and Organizational Integration Systems. His research interests are in designing group decision support systems, organizational integration systems, distributed decision-making systems, telecommunication networks, and economics of information systems. More information here.

ISE PhD student presented AR automotive application at IEEE VR'16

2016-04-04

ISE PhD student Hyungil Kim, Prof. Joe Gabbard’s advisee, delivered his recent works on automotive AR applications at the IEEE VR '16 (in Greenville, SC, 3/19-23) and the ACM IUI '16 (in Sonoma, CA, 3/7-10) conferences. In his IEEE VR paper "Casting shadows: Ecological interface design for augmented reality pedestrian collision warning" co-authored with Prof. Gabbard, he presented a novel AR driver interface based on a new design approach, ecological interface design (EID), to consider both human-computer interaction and human-environment interaction. In his ACM IUI paper, "Look at Me: Augmented Reality Pedestrian Warning System Using an In-Vehicle Volumetric Head Up Display" co-authored with 5 Honda researchers, he showed benefits of this novel interface in drivers' braking performance by an experimental user study conducted on the real road.

David Hicks joins the CHCI

2016-01-07

David Hicks, an associate professor of history and social science education (Social Studies) in the School of Education at Virginia Tech, is the newest faculty affiliate in the Center for HCI. David is the program area leader for History and Social Science (Social Studies) Education in the faculty of Teaching and Learning and affiliate faculty of Learning Sciences and Technologies. He holds a BA (Honors) in Social History from Lancaster University (UK), a Postgraduate Certificate in Education with distinctions in theory and practice from Leeds University (UK), an MA in History from the State University of New York at Cortland, and a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from Virginia Tech. David taught middle school and high school social studies in New York state and served as a museum curator/educator at the History Museum of Western Virginia on the “29 Let’s Go” D-day exhibit before completing his Ph.D. You can find more information on his personal website. Welcome, David!

Archived News 2015

CHCI20 Plenary Panel recording now available

2015-11-27

After the successful event of our 20-year celebration on October 15-16th, 2015 we are glad to release the recording of the Plenary Panel that opened the event. Participants were Dr. John Carroll and Dr. Marybeth Rosson (founding members) from Penn State University, Dr. Deborah Hix, former CHCI faculty member, and our own Dr. Doug Bowman (current Director) and Dr. Edward Fox, along with Dr. Scott McCrickard (moderator).

Best paper award for CHCI members at ICAT-EGVE conference

2015-11-20

Graduate student Mahdi Nabiyouni and advisor Dr. Doug Bowman received the best paper award at the prestigious ICAT-EGVE conference, for their paper "An Evaluation of the Effects of Hyper-Natural Components of Interaction Fidelity on Locomotion Performance in Virtual Reality." Paper abstract: Hyper-natural interaction techniques are intentionally designed to enhance users’ abilities beyond what is possible in the real world. We compared such hyper-natural techniques to their natural counterparts on a wide range of locomotion tasks for a variety of measures. The results show that the effects of the hyper-natural transfer function was mostly positive, however, hyper-natural techniques designed to provide biomechanical assistance had lower performance and user acceptance than those based on natural walking movements.

Aisling Kelliher joins the CHCI

2015-11-13

Aisling Kelliher, an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at Virginia Tech, where she also has a joint appointment in the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology and the School of Visual Art, is the newest faculty affiliate in the Center for HCI. Aisling received a Ph.D. in Media, Arts and Sciences from the MIT Media Lab and is joining VT from the Carnegie Mellon School of Design. Her research centers on the creation and study of interactive media systems for enhancing reflection, learning, and communication. You can find more information on her personal website. Welcome, Aisling!

Congratulations to Shaymaa Khater on successful PhD defense

2015-11-13

Shaymaa Khater successfully defended her PhD dissertation, "Personalized Recommendation for Online Social Networks Information: Personal Preferences and Location Based Community Trends," with advisor Denis Gracanin. In her research, Shaymaa presents TrendFusion, an innovative model that analyzes the trends propagation, predicts the localized diffusion of trends in social networks and recommends the most interesting trends to the user. During the dissertation work they found that performance evaluation demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed recommendation system, with TrendFusion accurately predicting places in which a trend will appear, with 98% recall and 80% precision. Congratulations, Shaymaa!

NSF grant on Computational Thinking awarded to Dr. Deborah Tatar

2015-11-03

Project Title: Chem+C: Integration of Environmental Chemistry and Computing to Advance Evidence-based Reasoning, Problem Solving, and Computational Thinking in Middle School Students. The CHEM+C is a two-year, $1,250,000 project funded by the NSF to investigate a method of broadening access to CT thinking by providing it in a context that all students take: 8th Grade Integrated Science. This method will also expose students to how CT can interact with and deepen the understanding of chemistry. The project embeds targeted chemistry topics into editable, runnable computational models in a pedagogy of structured scientific argumentation. Students will learn about chemical systems through interacting with models as they are represented visually, and about CT through modifying and adapting the code to better represent aspects of the chemical systems. The PI is Deborah Tatar, Professor of Computer Science, ICAT Fellow and Member of the Center for Human-Computer Interaction; Felicia Etzkorn, Professor of Chemistry, brings her expertise as co-PI. Two additional co-PI’s, Drs. Victor Sampson and Stephanie Rivale, from University of Texas Austin, bring expertise in Science Education and Assessment. The project will work primarily with four teachers in the Austin, Texas area.

Calling all CHCI Alumni

2015-09-02

Calling all CHCI Alumni to the Center's 20-year anniversary celebration on October 15-17, 2015. Join us in a unique 3-day event with talks, demos, tours, awards, and lots of socializing opportunities among alumni and current students and faculty. Please, use the event website at www.chci20.hci.vt.edu to REGISTER for this special event by September 30! A limited number of hotel rooms has been also held for participants visiting Blacksburg until September 15. Visit the event website for the complete schedule, activities, and all event-related information.

CHCI welcomes new member Dane Webster

2015-07-06

The Center for HCI is pleased to welcome its newest member, Dane Webster. Dane is an Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts, focusing on 3D modeling, visualization, and animation. Welcome, Dane!

Thomas Tucker newest member of CHCI

2015-06-29

Thomas Tucker, an Associate Professor of Creative Technologies in the School of Visual Arts, is the newest faculty affiliate in the Center for HCI. Thomas is a visual artist specializing in 3D modeling, visualization, and animation, and he has already worked extensively with several CHCI members. Welcome, Thomas!

CHCI faculty members promoted to full professor

2015-06-29

The CHCI offers its congratulations to long-standing faculty members Deborah Tatar and Steve Sheetz, who have been promoted to the rank of full professor at Virginia Tech (VT News article). Deborah, a member of the Computer Science faculty, directs the POET (Pragmatics of Educational/Emotional Computing Lab), while Steve is in the department of Accounting and Information Systems in the Pamplin College of Business.

Congratulations to Felipe Bacim on successful PhD defense

2015-06-23

On June 22, Felipe Bacim successfully defended his PhD dissertation, "Increasing Selection Accuracy and Speed through Progressive Refinement." In this innovative research, Felipe designed and evaluated 3D selection techniques based on the concept of gradual refinement of the set of selectable objects, rather than single immediate selections. The work has been published in the IEEE Symposium on 3D User Interfaces and the International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, among others. Felipe will soon begin work at Apple, Inc. Congratulations, Felipe!

Nathan Lau joins the CHCI

2015-06-23

Nathan Lau, an Assistant Professor in the Grado Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, is the newest faculty affiliate in the Center for HCI. Nathan's research centers on display and interface design for operations centers in a variety of domains. Welcome, Nathan!

CHCI welcomes our newest member Todd Ogle

2015-04-12

Todd Ogle is the Director of Networked Knowledge Environments in VT's Technology-Enhanced Learning and Online Strategies or TLOS. Todd has been working with CHCI Director Doug Bowman for several years on the use of mobile augmented reality for historical inquiry learning, and he is involved in several other AR and educational technology projects. For more information please see here.

Congratulations to Mohammed Seyam, 2015-16 BoV graduate student representative

2015-04-02

Congratulations to Mohammed Seyam for being appointed graduate student representative to the Board of Visitors. Mohammed is a graduate student in our PhD program working in HCI with Dr. Scott McCrickard. Read the full article at VT News.

Congratulations to Ashley Robinson, successful PhD defense 3/27/15

2015-04-02

Title: A Mixed Methods Approach to Understanding the Attitudes of Minority Middle School Girls Toward Computer Science
Advisor: Manuel A. Perez-Quinones

Abstract: The number of women in computing is significantly low compared to the number of men in the discipline, with minority women making up an even small segment of this population. Related literature accredits phenomenon to multiple sources (e.g. background, stereotypes, discrimination, self-confidence, etc.), which includes a lack of self-efficacy or belief in ones capabilities. However, a majority of the literature fails to represent minority females, such as African Americans, in their research.

This research uses a mixed methods approach to understanding the attitudes of minority middle school girls toward computer science and the factors that influence these attitudes. Since women who do pursue computing degrees and continue with graduate education often publish in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in greater proportions than men, this research used an intervention to introduce minority middle school girls to computational thinking concepts through HCI. To expand the scope of the data collection, a separate group of girls were introduced to computational thinking concepts through algorithms. Data was collected through both quantitative and qualitative sources, and analyzed using inferential statistics and content analysis.

The results show that minority middle school girls generally have negative attitudes toward computer science. However, after participating in a computer science intervention, perceptions toward computer science become positive. The results also reveal that several factors influence the attitudes of middle school girls toward computer science such as the participation in an intervention, the intervention content domain, the facilitation of performance accomplishments, and participant characteristics like socioeconomic status, mother's education, school grades, the use of mobile phones and video game consoles at home.

Archived News 2014

NUI project fair presents innovative natural user interfaces Dec. 9

2014-12-04

The students in this semester's Natural User Interfaces graduate seminar class will be presenting the innovative NUIs they've been developing at a project fair next Tuesday. NUI class project fair Tuesday, Dec. 9, 3:30-5:30 PM In the Cube at the Moss Arts Center The six inspiring projects that will be presented use state-of-the-art NUI technologies like the Oculus Rift, the Leap Motion Controller, the Myo gesture control armband, and the Perceptive Pixel advanced multi-touch display. Projects include an in-air musical instrument, a gesture-controlled text input method, a game for autistic children based on tangible interaction, and bare-hand interaction with a large 3D virtual environment. The public is welcome. Drop in any time. Please forward to anyone who might be interested. Come join us for a glimpse of the future of natural interaction!

CHCI Celebration a great success

2014-09-09

The Center celebrated its new affiliations with ICAT and ICTAS at a "CHCI Celebration" on Monday, September 8 at the Moss Arts Center. Approximately 100 guests enjoyed interactive demonstrations (including a virtual reality experience in the Cube), engaging posters, and stimulating conversation. The event was hosted by the directors of the Center and the two Institutes: Doug Bowman (CHCI), Roop Mahajan (ICTAS), and Ben Knapp (ICAT). The CHCI was proud to showcase the awesome work of its faculty and students. Check out our Flickr Photostream for images of the event.

Warm welcome to our new CHCI faculty member Kurt Luther

2014-09-09

The CHCI is delighted to announce its new member, a newly appointed CS faculty as Assistant Professor, Kurt Luther. Luther's main research interests include human-computer interaction (HCI), social computing and crowd-sourcing, and creativity support tools. Specifically, he builds and studies social computing systems to enhance human creativity and problem solving abilities, in domains such as computer animation, visual design, knowledge discovery, and citizen science. He is also interested in connections to the digital humanities, especially history. Luther holds a Bachelor's degree in Computer Graphics Technology (minor in Art and Design) from Purdue University and a Doctoral degree in Human-Centered Computing from Georgia Tech.

CHCI celebrates new ICAT/ICTAS affiliation September 8

2014-08-25

The Center for Human-Computer Interaction (CHCI) invites you to attend a special event celebrating its new affiliation with the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology (ICAT) and the Institute for Critical Technologies and Applied Science (ICTAS). The event will be held at the Cube in the Moss Arts Center, and will feature: - Interactive demonstrations, video, and research posters - Virtual Reality experiences in the Cube facility - Special presentations at 4:30 PM by Ben Knapp (ICAT), Roop Mahajan (ICTAS), and Doug Bowman (CHCI) - Free food and drinks Come celebrate with us! CHCI was established in 1995 and is one of the nation\'s premier research centers in human-computer interaction. Research areas include visualization and analytics, interactive displays and devices, social collaborative computing, and data/information/knowledge. The Cube is located just to the left of the main entrance of the Moss Arts Center (190 Alumni Mall) at Virginia Tech. The event is open to the entire Virginia Tech community. For more information, contact Doug Bowman (bowman@vt.edu). Download the event announcement

ICAT day featuring a strong set of CHCI demos

2014-05-15

Learn more about the research of the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology (ICAT) and meet the faculty and students who are crossing traditional discipline boundaries to develop new possibilities for exploration, expression, and creativity during ICAT Day on Monday, May 5th. The collection of events, which are free and open to the public, showcases the work and ideas that have been generated from ICAT faculty and students during the spring semester. The event, which will include expo-style informational booths, technology demonstrations, and hands-on activities, will be held in the Moss Arts Center, located at 190 Alumni Mall. Activities will be offered from noon until 6 p.m., unless otherwise noted. The full event schedule and poster can be found here.

Chris North honored with research award

2014-05-15

CHCI faculty member Chris North, professor of computer science, received the 2014 College of Engineering Dean's Award for Excellence in Research for his work on visual analytics and information visualization. Congratulations, Chris!

CHCI students dominate the international 3DUI Symposium Contest

2014-04-23

For the fourth time in five years, a team of doctoral students from the Center for Human-Computer Interaction has won the top prize in the IEEE 3-D User Interfaces contest. The Virginia Tech team devised a solution entitled "Slice-n-Swipe" that provided multiple virtual tools to allow users to annotate point clouds using natural in-air gestures. Read the full story at the COE News website.

Doug Bowman lauded for his achievements in virtual reality

2014-04-10

Doug A. Bowman, professor of computer science and director of the Center for Human-Computer Interaction in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has received the 2014 Visualization and Graphics Technical Committee technical achievement award in virtual reality from the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). The international award recognizes Bowman for his research and design achievements that have significantly advanced knowledge in the fields of three-dimensional user interfaces and virtual reality systems. Read the full story at the College of Engineering website.

Active representation and participation of CHCI at CSCW '14

2014-02-21

CHCI members and past members Deborah Tatar, Steve Harrison, Scott McCrickard, Aditya Johri, Stacy Branham, Joon Suk Lee, Robert Beaton, Siroberto Scerbo, Michael Stewart, and Samantha Yglesias attended the CSCW 2014 conference in Baltimore Maryland from Feb. 16-19th. Dr. Branham, who had passed the final defense for her doctorate only four days before, organized a workshop on Co-creating and Identity-Making in CSCW: Revisiting Ethics in Design Research, that drew participants from around the world, including Ms. Yglesias, and Professors Tatar and Harrison. Dr. Lee, recent doctoral student and now a professor at Virginia State College, delivered a paper called the Sounds of Silence: Exploring Contributions to Conversations, Non-responses and the Impact of Mediating Technologies in Triple Space", co-authored with Prof. Tatar. Dr. Johri, now at George Mason, reported on work conducted while at Virginia Tech, with graduate student Janaki Srinivasan entitled "The Role of Data in Aligning the 'Unique Identity' Infrastructure in India." Dr. McCrickard oversaw and presented the conference video program together with Katie Derthick of University of Washington. Robert Beaton, Siroberto Scerbo and Michael Stewart were student volunteers.

Interdisciplinary Research Day 2014 - February 27th

2014-02-06

Come join the Interdisciplinary Research Honor Society for it's 4th Annual IDR Day! This year we are changing things up a bit and combining the best of our research symposium and roundtable problem-solving events into one, with something for everyone. We have an exciting lineup of speakers who will share their insights into working in interdisciplinary teams, interdisciplinary graduate education, and how to bridge science, technology and the arts. Graduate and undergraduate students will showcase their own IDR in poster sessions, and we'll wrap up with a FREE buffet dinner and engaging roundtable discussions to try to solve some important regional problems in diverse teams. IDR Day is FREE and open to anyone on campus! Science, Engineering, Liberal Arts... undergrads through faculty and staff, we welcome and strongly encourage all to participate in this unique event!

When: Thursday, February 27th, 2014, 1:00-8:30pm
Where: The Inn @ Virginia Tech
Registration Deadline: Sunday, February 23rd
(register at http://www.idrsociety.org/idr-day-2014/)
Cost: FREE

For more information, list of speakers and schedule, please visit our website at http://www.idrsociety.org/idr-day-2014/.

Virginia Tech HPC Day 2014: Call for Participation

2014-01-19

April 11: Squires Student Center, Blacksburg Campus

As the breadth and impact of High Performance Computing (HPC) and Visualization continue to grow, Virginia Tech is proud to host an inaugural day-long event to connect the campus community in a computational commonwealth. HPC Day provides an occasion to explore the myriad ways that supercomputing is changing our world and to celebrate Virginia Tech's contributions. In the morning, Advanced Research Computing labs and VT IT resourcesand facilities will host open house tours. We will host a lunchtime Keynote speaker. Student work, research labs and units will be showcased with an afternoon poster session. Panels will bring out VT faculty and administrators to discuss the applications of HPC as well as the visions for the future.

Schedule of Events: (tentative)

9:00-11:00 ARC Open House
- Andrews Information Systems Building (AISB): visit the VT IT machine room
- Visionarium Lab (Torgersen 3050): Demos on the VisCube and a chance to explore/interact with other visualization equipment

12-1:15 Keynote speaker (TBD)
Old Dominion Ballroom

2:00-4:00 Poster Session for students and faculty
Williamsburg Room & Squires Atrium

4:00-5:00 Panel 1- Computing at the Edge: Applications of HPC and HPV
Brush Mountain

5:00-6:00 Panel 2- Computing the Future: Computational Science at Virginia Tech
Brush Mountain

Pardha Pyla, Outstanding Young Alumnus of COE

2014-01-07

CS alum Pardha Pyla was recently selected as an Outstanding Young Alumnus of COE. This year (as last) there will be 2 alumni of COE so honored at the COE Academy of Excellence induction dinner in spring 2014. We are very proud of Pardha's receiving this award! We are grateful, also, for the invaluable assistance of his advisor, emeritus professor Rex Hartson, in preparing this nomination. In addition, folks at Bloomberg, Pardha's current employer, provided a valuable support letter.

The award is governed by the following rules:
The Alumni Association and College of Engineering are inviting your proposal of a candidate from your department to receive recognition during the 2012-13 academic year. This award is typically given at the Academy of Engineering Excellence dinner. Each year the Alumni Association continues its recognition of recent alumni with the selection of one Outstanding Recent Alumnus or Alumna from each college.Recipients must be graduates of the past ten years (2002 or more recently). Each should have distinguished him or herself professionally in his/her career or in rendering service to the university since graduating.

Archived News 2013

Alex Endert awarded the IEEE VGTC Best Doctoral Dissertation Award

2013-10-21

Alex Endert was awarded the first annual IEEE VGTC Best Doctoral Dissertation Award. The award was presented at the IEEE VIS Conference in October 2013. Alex completed his dissertation in Computer Science at Virginia Tech in August 2012, under advisor Chris North. His dissertation is entitled "Semantic Interaction for Visual Analytics: Inferring Analytical Reasoning for Model Steering". Alex also won the Best Dissertation Award in the Department of Computer Science.

"The IEEE VGTC Doctoral Dissertation Competition IEEE Computer Society Visualization and Graphics Technical Committee (VGTC) has recently established the Best Doctoral Dissertation Award program to recognize outstanding academic research and development in visualization and visual analytics. The dissertations must address a topic relevant to visualization or visual analytics. The competition will be administrated by the IEEE VGTC Visualization Pioneers Group (VPG) under the auspices of VGTC. The award, to be known as the IEEE/VGTC VIS Pioneers Group Doctoral Dissertation Award, will be presented annually at the VPG Reception held at IEEE VIS conference."

Ji-Sun Kim named 2nd place winner in ACM Grace Hopper Celebration

2013-10-21

Congratulations to Ji-Sun Kim, 2012-2013 PHD graduate of our department with co-advisors Denis Gracanin and Francis Quek, on being named 2nd place winner of the ACM Grace Hopper Celebration Graduate Student Research Competition earlier this month. Her competition entry, entitled "Action-Transferred Design Approach of Navigation Techniques for Effective Spatial Learning in 3D Virtual Environments", describes the core part of her doctoral research.

Ji-Sun describes her research thusly: "The proposed action-transferred design approach was inspired by observations from theories of learning, action, perception, and neuropsychology. We empirically demonstrated the proposed action-transferred design approach addresses the practical usability issues of previous walking-like navigation techniques, while effectively supporting spatial learning. We believe that the action-transferred design approach can open many research opportunities and applications in human computer interaction (HCI) research area. These applications include virtual exploration of scientific datasets, historic places, or real estate, architectural or urban design, military or firefighting training, and even robotics (operation of unmanned vehicles)."

This is the 2nd year in a row that CS@VT has had a graduate student win 2nd place in this competition. As a winner of a Student Research Competition at GHC, Ji-Sun will be eligible to participate in the Grand Finals of all the ACM Student Research Competitions for 2013-2014:

Yelp Dataset Challenge: VT CHCI team wins grand prize

2013-10-09

VT CHCI graduate student Ji Wang, alumnus Sheng Guo and professor Chris North along with graduate student Jian Zhao from the University of Toronto, have won the grand prize of the Yelp Dataset Challenge. The award announcement can be found here.

The abstract of their winning project titled "Clustered Layout Word Cloud for User Generated Review" is the following: User generated reviews, like those found on Yelp and Amazon, have become important reference material for decision making in our daily life, for example, in dining, shopping and entertainment. However, the large amounts of available reviews make the reading process tedious. In this project, we present a word cloud visualization of user generated reviews based on semantics to facilitate the decision making tasks. We used a natural language processing approach, called grammatical dependency parsing, to create a semantic graph based on the review content. A force-directed layout was then applied to the semantic graph to generate the clustered layout word cloud. Our approach can afford users more insights about reviews by creating word clusters spatially based on their semantic information. We also conducted an experiment to compare the efficiency of our method with two alternative review reading techniques: random layout word cloud and normal text-based reviews. The results showed that the proposed technique had faster task completion times and better user satisfactions.

CHCI students finalists in NUMA competition

2013-09-18

Siroberto Scerbo and Felipe Bacim, Ph.D. students in CHCI and Computer Science, along with advisor Doug Bowman, have been named finalists in the 2013 Nokia Ubimedia Mindtrek Awards (NUMA). Their project "Insane Llamas" is a next-generation augmented reality game that allows players to defeat evil llamas hiding in the physical real-world environment by shooting virtual kiwis with a physical slingshot attached to an iPad. The game began as a class project in Bowman's 3D Interaction seminar. Based on a submission video, the team was named one of four winners of the competition, and will compete for the top prize Oct. 2 in Finland.

CHCI fall kickoff event Sept. 9

2013-09-02

Welcome to new students, and welcome back to returning students! The Center for HCI will hold a fall kickoff event for students and faculty next Monday, September 9, from 5:00 to 6:00 PM. The event will be held in KnowledgeWorks II, room 1110.

We'll have free food and drink, and a gift for each student attending. We'll also share with you some of the many ways that the CHCI can support you and enhance your time at VT. Come and hear all about it, and catch up with other HCI students and professors!

Alumna Dr. Jamika Burge

2013-09-02

At a time when only 2% of PhDs in CS go to African-Americans, our department continues to steadily graduate African-Americans PhDs in CS. In this writeup, we celebrate one of our former PhD students, now a colleague, Dr. Jamika Burge. She is a strong contributor to the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing and the ACM Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing.

Jamika D. Burge received her PhD in 2007 from Virginia Tech, where she worked with Dr. Deborah Tatar. She was an IBM Research Fellow and won an IBM Research Dissertation Fellowship. As a graduate student, her research and perspectives were featured in the New York Times and Computerworld. Upon graduation, she was a postdoctoral research scholar at The Pennsylvania State University focusing on community informatics, where former VT HCI Center director, Jack Carroll, served as her postdoc mentor.

Today, Jamika D. Burge is a Senior Scientist at Information Systems Worldwide (i_SW), a technology, engineering, and research company with offices in Virginia and Maryland, that provides high-end advanced technical, integration, engineering and analysis solutions to the US Government and other customers. In her current work, she serves as a DARPA consultant/SME (subject matter expert) on research programs that promote learning through advanced educational technologies and develop tools that analyze patterns in everyday behaviors to detect subtle changes associated with PTSD and depression.

Dr. Burge is also chair of the Coalition to Diversify Computing (CDC, http://www.cdc-computing.org), based in Washington, DC. The CDC seeks to increase the number of minority students and faculty successfully transitioning into computing-based careers in academia, federal laboratories, and industry. As a CDC committee member, she also serves as co-director of the Collaborative Research Experiences for Undergraduates (CREU) program and chairs the Women of Color in Computing initiative (http://www.cdc-computing.org/programs/current-programs/womenofcolor/).

Final Defense for Jeremy Barksdale

2013-07-12

Title: Social Integration in Agile User Experience: Building Social Capital in Agile User Experience Software Teams
Date: July 12, 2013
Place: KWII 1127
Time: 8:00 AM

You are invited to attend.

VT team places 6th in the DARPA Virtual Robotics Challenge

2013-07-05

Congratulations to Doug Bowman and his colleagues on placing 6th in the DARPA Virtual Robotics Challenge. This means that the VT team in collaboration with TU Darmstadt will proceed to the next phase of the competition, and will receive an ATLAS robot to use in this next phase. Doug reports that Felipe Bacim (CS Ph.D. student) was the leader of the Operator Control Station (user interface) aspect of the project.

This achievement was featured in the July 3rd ACM TechNews, great publicity for our research and our department.

Micro-Coordination: Looking into the details of face-to-face coordination

2013-05-09

Time: 10:30 Monday May 13
Place: KWII room 1110

Abstract:
Sociality is one of the most fundamental aspects of being human. The key to sociality is coordination, that is, the bringing of people "into a common action, movement or condition" [133]. Coordination is, at base, how social creatures get social things done in the world. Being social creatures, we engage in highly coordinative activities in everyday life-two girls play hopscotch together, a group of musicians play jazz in a jam session and a father teaches a son how to ride a bicycle. Even mundane actions such as greetings, answering a phone call, and asking a question to ask a question by saying "Can I ask you a question?" are complex and intricate. Actors not only need to plan and perform situated actions, but also need to process the responding actions--even unforeseen ones--from the other party in real time and adjust their own subsequent actions. Yet, we expertly coordinate with each other in performing highly intricate coordinative actions.

In this work, I look at how people coordinate joint activities at the moment of interaction and aim to unveil a range of coordinative issues, using "methodologies and approaches that fundamentally question the mainstream frameworks that define what counts as knowledge" (p.2, [79]) in the field of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). To investigate computer mediated interactions among co-located people, I examine different interactional choices people make in the course of carrying out their joint activities, and the consequences of their choices.

By investigating co-located groups as they played a collaborative, problem-solving game using distributed technologies in experimental settings, I (1) provide critical case reports which question and challenge non-discussed, often-taken-for-granted assumptions about face-to-face interactions and coordination, and (2) tie the observations to the creation of higher level constructs which, in turn, can affect subsequent design choices.

More specifically, I ran two studies to look at how co-located people coordinate and manage their attention, tasks at hand, and joint activities in an experimental setting. I asked triads to work on a Sudoku puzzle collectively as a team. I varied support for the deictic mechanism in the software as well as form factors of mediating technology.

My research findings show that:

1. different tools support different deictic behaviors. Explicit support for pointing is desirable to support complex reference tasks, but may not be needed for simpler ones. On the other hand, users without sophisticated explicit support may give up the attempt to engaged in complex reference.
2. talk is diagnostic of user satisfaction but lack of talk is not diagnostic of dissatisfaction. Therefore, designers must be careful in their use of talk as a measurement of collaboration.
3. the more people talk about complex relationships in the puzzle, the higher their increase in positive emotion. Either engaging with the problem at hand is rewarding or having the ability to engage with the problem effectively enough to speak about it is engaging.
4. amount of talk is related to form factor. People in both computer conditions talked less about the specifics oF the game board than people in the paper condition, but only people in the laptop condition experienced a significant decrease in positive emotion.
5. different mediating technologies afford different types of non-response situations. The most common occurrences of non-responses were precipitated by speakers talking to themselves in the computer conditions. Participants did not talk to themselves much in the paper condition.

Differences in technology form factors may influence peoples behaviors and emotion differently. These findings represent a portrait of how different technologies provide different interactional possibilities for people.

With my quantitative and qualitative analyses I do not make bold and futile claims such as "using a highlighter tool will make users collaborate more efficiently," or "making people talk more will make the group perform better." I, instead, illustrate the interactional choices people made in the presence of given technological conditions and how their choices eventuated in situ.

I then propose processlessness as an idea for preparing designs that are open to multiple interactional possibilities, and nudgers as an idea for enabling and aiding users to create and design their own situated experiences.

Dan Tilden's MS Thesis Defense

2013-05-05

Title: Design and Evaluation of a Web-Based Programming Tool to Improve the Introductory Computer Science Experience
Time: Tuesday 5/7, 10:00am
Place: 1110 KWII

Introductory computer science courses can be notoriously difficult for students, especially those outside of the major. There are many reasons for this, but based on our experience, the programming software itself may play a significant role. To investigate this issue, we have developed Pythy, a web-based programming environment which allows students to write, execute, and test programming assignments from within the familiar interface of a web browser. In this work, we discuss various aspects of Pythy in detail, including the rationale behind its design, the system architecture on which it is built, and the various functions offered by the software. Next, we discuss an evaluation of Pythy's effectiveness conducted during a programming course for non CS-majors offered at Virginia Tech, comparing responses from Pythy users to responses from users of a different software solution in another programming course. The results of these surveys suggest that Pythy was successful in several target areas, including making it easier to get started with programming and providing feedback about program behavior. We then discuss an analysis of access log data from Pythy itself, revealing details about how students used the system. Finally, we conclude with a summary of key contributions and suggest some potential future directions for the system.

Laha awarded prestigious IBM Fellowship

2013-04-19

CHCI Ph.D. student Bireswar Laha was recently awarded a prestigious IBM Ph.D. Fellowship. Laha, who works with Professor Doug Bowman in the 3D Interaction Group, studies the use of virtual reality and 3D user interfaces in the analysis of volume datasets. Congratulations, Bireswar!

Full story on the College of Engineering website.

Eric Ragan's Final Defense

2013-04-19

Title: Supporting Learning through Spatial Information Presentations in Virtual Environments
Committee: Doug Bowman (Chair), Richard Mayer, Chris North, Francis Quek, Tonya Smith-Jackson Time and Place:1:00pm Monday, April 22, in KWII 1110.

Abstract:

Though many researchers have suggested that 3D virtual environments (VEs) could provide advantages for conceptual learning, few studies have attempted to evaluate the validity of this claim. A wide variety of educational VEs have been developed, but little empirical evidence exists to help researchers and educators determine the effectiveness of these applications. Additional evidence is needed in order to decide whether VEs should be used to aid conceptual learning. Furthermore, if there is evidence that VEs can support learning, developers and researchers will still need to understand how to design effective educational applications. While many educational VEs share the challenge of providing learners with information within 3D spaces, few researchers have investigated what approaches are used to help learn new information from 3D spatial representations. It is not understood how well learners can take advantage of 3D layouts to help understand information. Additionally, although complex arrangements of information within 3D space can potentially allow for large amounts of information to be presented within a VE, accessing this information can become more difficult due to the increased navigational challenges.

Complicating these issues are details regarding display types and interaction devices used for educational applications. Compared to desktop displays, more immersive VE systems often provide display features (e.g., stereoscopy, increased field of view) that support improved perception and understanding of spatial information. Additionally, immersive VE often allow more familiar, natural interaction methods (e.g., physical walking or rotation of the head and body) to control viewing within the virtual space. It is unknown how these features interact with the types of spatial information presentations to affect learning.

The research presented in this dissertation investigates these issues in order to further the knowledge of how to design VEs to support learning. The research includes six studies (five empirical experiments and one case study) designed to investigate how spatial information presentations affect learning effectiveness and learner strategies. This investigation includes consideration for the complexity of spatial information layouts, the features of display systems that could affect the effectiveness of spatial strategies, and the degree of navigational control for accessing information. Based on the results of these studies, we created a set of design guidelines for developing VEs for learning-related activities. By considering factors of virtual information presentation, as well as those based on the display-systems, our guidelines support design decisions for both the software and hardware required for creating effective educational VEs.

New courses on Human Centered Design

2013-04-16

The Human-Centered Design program that is starting up this fall is an interdisciplinary program combining expertise and approaches from the arts/humanities and the engineering/technology perspectives. They will offer a certificate in HCD as well.

This fall, two new courses will be offered:
1) ART 5524 TS: Human Centered Design T/TH 1500-1800 taught by Troy Abel
2) STS 6614-Advanced Topics in Technology Studies: Origins of Innovation taught by Matt Wisnioski

Contact Troy or Matt if you want more information, or if you want to sign up for the HCD certificate.

H. Lally Singh's final Ph.D. defense

2013-04-03

You are cordially invited to attend H. Lally Singh's final Ph.D. defense.

Title: Controlling Scalability in Distributed Virtual Environments

Time: 11:30 AM, Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Location: Lakeview Room, KWII

Committee: Denis Gracanin (chair), Roger Ehrich, Wu Feng, Ivica Ico Bukvic, and Shawn Bohner

Abstract:
A distributed Virtual Environment (DVE) system provides a shared virtual environment where physically separated users can interact and collaborate over a computer network. An increase in the number of simultaneous DVE users could result in system performance degradation, i.e., limited scalability in terms of the number of users. In order to improve DVE scalability, we address the three major challenges: effective DVE system performance measurement, understanding the controlling factors that determine system performance/quality and determining the consequences of DVE system changes.

We propose a DVE Scalability Engineering (DSE) process that addresses these three major challenges for DVE design. DSE allow us to identify, evaluate, and leverage trade-offs among the available DVE resources, the DVE software, and the virtual environment. The process consists of three stages. In the first stage we show how to simulate different numbers and types of users on DVE resources. The data collected from user studies are used to to identify the representative user types. In the second stage we describe a modeling method used to discover the major trade-offs between quality of service and DVE resource usage. The method makes use of a new performance instrumentation tool called ppt. ppt collects atomic blocks of developer-selected instrumentation at real-time rates and saves it for in-depth offline analysis. Finally, we integrate our load simulation and modeling methods in a single framework to explore the effects of changes in DVE resources.

We use a simple DVE, Asteroids, as a proof-of-concept case study to describe the DSE process.
Two full-size, commercial DVE systems, Torque and Quake III, provide realistic case studies and demonstrate DSE usage.
The Torque case study shows the impact of a large number of users on a DVE system.
We apply the DSE process to significantly enhance the Quality of Experience given the available DVE resources.
The Quake III case study shows how to identify the DVE network needs and evaluate network characteristics when using a mobile phone platform. We analyze the trade-offs between power consumption and quality of service.

The case studies demonstrate the applicability of DSE for discovering and leveraging trade-offs between Quality of Experience and DVE resource usage. Each of the three stages can be used individually to improve DVE performance. Using the overall DSE process enables fast and effective DVE performance improvement.

Chao Peng's final Ph.D. defense

2013-03-31

You are cordially invited to attend Chao Peng's final Ph.D. defense.

Title: Real-time Visualization of Massive 3D Models on GPU Parallel Architectures

Time: 1:00pm, Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Location: KWII 1110

Committee: Yong Cao (chair), Doug A. Bowman, Ming C. Lin, Chris North and Dane Webster

Abstract: Real-time rendering massive 3D models has been recognized as a very challenging task because of the limited computational power and memory space available in a workstation. Most of existing acceleration techniques, such as mesh simplification algorithms with hierarchical data structures, are suffered from the nature of sequential executions. As data complexity continues to increase due to the fundamental advances in modeling and simulation technologies, 3D models become complex and may need several gigabytes in storage. Consequently, visualizing them becomes a computationally intensive process where the sequential-based solutions can not satisfy the demands of real-time rendering and interaction.

Recently, Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) as a massively parallel architecture has been praised because of not only its significant improvements in performance but also its programmability for general-purpose computation. Today's GPUs allow researchers to solve problems by delivering fine-grained parallel implementations. In this dissertation, I concentrate on the design of parallel algorithms for real-time rendering massive 3D polygonal models towards modern GPU architectures. As a result, the delivered rendering system supports high-performance visualization of the 3D model composed of hundreds of millions of polygon primitives on a single standard PC workstation.

Ji-Sun Kim's Final Ph.D. defense

2013-03-25

You are cordially invited to attend Ji-Sun Kim's Final Ph.D. defense.

Title: Action-Inspired Approach to Design of Navigation Techniques for Effective Spatial Learning in 3-D Virtual Environments

Time: 10:30 AM, Monday, March 25, 2013
Location: Room 1127, KWII
Committee: Denis Gracanin (co-chair), Francis Quek (co-chair), Doug A. Bowman, Ivica Ico Bukvic, and Woodrow W. Winchester III

Abstract:
Navigation in large spaces is essential in any environment (both the real world and the virtual world) because one of the human fundamental needs is to know the surrounding environment and to freely navigate within the environment. Successful navigation in large-scale virtual environments (VEs) requires accurate spatial knowledge, especially training and learning application domains, because people can effectively understand spatial layout and objects in environments and because spatial knowledge acquired from a large-scale VE can effectively be transferred to the real world activities.
We propose an action-inspired approach, to design convenient and effective navigation techniques for spatial knowledge acquisition/spatial learning, which is based on our insights from learning, neuropsychological and neurophysiological theories. The theories suggest that action and perception are closely related and core elements of learning. Our observation indicated that specific body-parts are not necessarily related to learning.
We provided two navigation techniques, body-turn based and action-transferred based ones, and demonstrated the benefits of our approach by evaluating these two navigation techniques for spatial knowledge acquisition through several empirical studies. We also developed our own walking-like navigation technique, Sensor-Fusion Walking-in-Place (SF-WIP) because we needed a reference navigation technique for estimating spatial knowledge acquisition to see how close the effect of the action-transferred navigation technique on spatial knowledge acquisition is to that of a walking-like navigation technique.
The experimental results showed that body-turn based navigation technique was more effective in survey knowledge acquisition in a large-scale, large-extent and visually impoverished virtual maze than a wand-joystick based common navigation technique (JS, i.e., non-body-based and non-walking-like navigation technique). Our action-transferred approach is useful for designing convenient and effective navigation techniques for spatial learning. Some design implications are discussed, suggesting that our action-transferred approach is not limited to navigation techniques and can be extensively used to design (general) interaction techniques. In particular, action-transferred design can be more effectively used for the users with disabilities (unable to use of a part of the body) or for fatigue/convenience reasons.

Calendar of HCI-related Conferences/Events

2013-03-22

The Interaction Design Foundation offers a useful list of conferences that apply to HCI for the current year with submission dates included. Links below are the interactive and printer-friendly versions.

Printer-friendly: http://www.interaction-design.org/calendar/printerfriendly.html
Interactive: http://www.interaction-design.org/calendar/

CSCW and DIS aren't listed yet, but should be added soon. The page is community driven, so check back often.

Visual Computing is hiring!

2013-03-22

Graduate Assistantships:

  • ARC Visual Computing - begins Summer 2013
  • Interactive 3D Training Platforms - begins Summer 2013
  • Web3D Geospatial Services - begins Fall 2013
Please send a Cover Letter and CV to Nicholas Polys
The Visionarium Lab is part of VT's Advanced Research Computing (ARC) Group.
A selection of examples of our work can be seen at this Youtube channel

ARC Visual Computing
The VT Visionarium seeks talented and motivated candidates to join our team innovating information and scientific visualizations with virtual environment technology. As an open lab for the campus community with world-class infrastructure, the Visionarium is a dynamic learning and research environment. We work with faculty research groups and projects from around campus and empower them with visualization solutions. As such, there are many opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration, applied visualization development, experimental research, and publication especially in the areas touched by high-performance visualization. The ideal candidate will have a background in some 3D graphics tools as well as web and multimedia technologies and usability engineering. We value good communication skills as evidenced by writings and presentations. Typical tasks include: exercising and automating pipelines for data processing and visualization for a domain problem, testing and documenting the scalability of clusters and remote rendering setups or the integration of new input devices and displays.

Interactive 3D Training Platforms
This GRA will design, develop and evaluate a test bed platform for 3D multimodal training. Specifically, the project seeks to take advantage of new consumer technologies and gesture recognition frameworks in order to support the acquisition and transfer of maintenance and repair skills. Virtual training platforms can provide the advantages of lower cost, greater safety and increased accessibility; however task fidelity, tracker accuracy as well as the abstractions and formalisms describing the procedure can all impact the system's effectiveness. This GRA will work in a VT project team that includes a set of 3D modelers. This is a US Army project and all content is unclassified.

Web3D Geospatial Services
This GRA will develop and evaluate new methods of geodata processing and delivery, including open international standards (OGC, Web3D) and open source software (e.g. Geoserver). This project will leverage public geospatial data in a POSTGIS database, dynamically delivering 3D portrayals of geospatial data on demand. These interactive 3D views can be delivered to standalone clients (e.g. X3D) and native web clients (e.g. HTML5 / WebGL). This position will expand and evaluate our current prototype. Specifically, we are looking to improve support for data sources such as weather simulation, improve the integration with VT identity management services, and provide functionality for location-based annotations and discussions. This GRA is based in the Visionarium, but will work with faculty and staff from Virtual ICAT and 3DBlacksburg.

Participation at HCIC

2013-02-12

The call for participation for HCIC has been released. This year's topic is Big Data, led by Sue Dumain, Gary Olson, and Jaime Teevan.

The 2-3 page abstracts are due very soon -- Feb 22 -- so please think about whether there is anything you'd like to submit. Recall that only faculty members can present papers, though students certainly can be co-authors.

Particularly if you are planning to attend, think also about whether you have (or know of) a student who would benefit from going. Recall that we can send two students at no charge, assuming there is a VT faculty member in attendance.

More info is available at http://www.hcic.org (only accessible from a vt.edu domain).

Supporting participant costs of grad student research

2013-02-06

Graduate Students: If you seek support for the costs of participants in your research, please submit a research proposal as follows: a) Describe the background and plan for the study; b) explain why you need paid participants in your study; c) Include the IRB request; d) Specify which faculty you are working with on the research. e) Address whether the research falls under a funded project, and if so, please explain why funding cannot come from the funded project.

CHCI GRA funding competition

2013-02-01

CHCI Faculty: Need GRA help for one semester?

Purpose: The purpose of the program is to provide GRA funds to collaborative research teams within the CHCI, in order to improve the chances of the team obtaining significant external funding for their work.

Minimum requirements: At least two CHCI faculty members must be members of the research team. The team must have specific plans to seek external funding. The team must be willing to discuss their proposed research at a future CHCI meeting.

Proposal: Teams should submit a written proposal of no more than two pages (PDF) to Doug Bowman (bowman@vt.edu) with the following information:

- Title of the proposed research effort
- Brief overview of the proposed research effort: need, impact, research questions, approach
- Statement of the relevance of the research effort to the four CHCI focus areas
- Plans for seeking external funding: target program, approximate amount
- Team: names and departments of collaborating faculty, prior collaborations by team members - Why GRA support is needed to be competitive for external funding; how the GRA resource will be used
- Requested support (half-time or full-time GRA, one or two semesters)
- **NEW: If anyone on the team has received CHCI GRA funding in the past, what were the results of that support? (use up to an extra 1/2 page for this if needed)

Review criteria: Proposals will be reviewed with respect to the following criteria:

- Relevance to CHCI focus areas; priority will be given to research that strengthens the work in the CHCI four areas
- Prospects for future external funding (return on investment)
- Quality of the plan for making use of the GRA resource
- Quality of the research team

Submission and review process:

- Proposals should be submitted as PDF documents by email to Doug Bowman (bowman@vt.edu)
- Proposals must be received by 5:00 PM on the deadline.
- A small group of 2-3 CHCI faculty not involved in any proposals will review the proposals based on the criteria above and make a recommendation to the Center director.
- Results will be announced about one week after submission.

FAQ:

- Who hires the GRA? The research team does; the CHCI just provides the funding.
- How many awards will there be? It depends on the number of quality proposals and the size of the requests. We have funding for a full-time step 15 GRA, but this may be divided among more than one research team.
- Does the GRA come with tuition? Yes, the CS dept. is providing a tuition waiver.
- Can I submit more than one proposal? Yes.
- Do all team members need to be CHCI members? No, but at least two team members must be CHCI members, and preference will be given to teams that consist entirely of CHCI members.

Archived News 2012

3D Interaction Seminar Demo Videos

2012-05-14

If you missed the live 3D Interaction Seminar demos on May 3 you can see them on video here.

Projects include:
* Llamas vs. Kiwis - Augmented reality Angry Birds with a physical slingshot
* VIGOR - Two players, two Kinects, and an innovative gameplay concept
* Pixelbending - Control virtual water using martial-arts-like movements
* Extreme Jump Trainer - A Kinect-based athletics training game focusing on biomechanics
* Volume Cracker - Use your hands to crack open a volumetric dataset to discover hidden features inside

If you like the videos, pass them on to your friends! We are using hashtag #innovative3DI on Twitter.

Congratulations to the students: Bireswar Laha, Cheryl Stinson, Andy Wood, Anamary Leal, Panagiotis Apostolellis, Felipe Bacim, and Siroberto Scerbo.

Contact bowman@vt.edu for more information.

Prof. Francis Quek wins 2012 XCalibur Award

2012-04-23

Prof. Francis Quek is a winner of the Virginia Tech XCaliber award for 2012 in recognition of his innovative Physical Computing class More details

HCI Students win 1st Place Honors at IEEE 3D UI 2012 Conf

2012-04-01

Congratulations to PhD students Felipe Bacim, Eric Ragan, Siroberto Scerbo and Cheryl Stinson who took first place honors in the 3D User Interface Contest at the IEEE 3D User Interfaces Conference 2012.

The winning entry is described in this YouTube video.

Congratulations, as well, to their advisor, Prof. Doug Bowman. This is the third straight year HCI Center students have won the contest.

Title: Collaborative Navigation in Virtual Search and Rescue
The challenge this year was to build an application to enable collaborative navigation through a complicated 3D environment. Our team did a virtual search-and-rescue scenario where a rescuer is inside a virtual burning building looking for survivors and the other is a commander who is monitoring progress on an interactive map of the building. The commander suggests paths for the rescuer to follow in order to ensure coverage of the whole building, while the rescuer places markers in the building to indicate the location of survivors, blockages, hazards, and new openings in the building.

UX Jobs Recruiting: Bloomberg

2012-02-23

Tuesday, Feb 28 at 5 pm, KWII Room 1110 Shahtab Wahid and Pardha Pyla of Bloomberg (VT CS/HCI alumni) will be recruiting for positions at Bloomberg. Bring your resumes/portfolios. Refreshments! *UX POSITIONS* Interaction Designer {http://careers.bloomberg.com/hire/jobs/job32169.html} (ignore the OOP/Flash/Flex, Blend/WPF, Director, HTML/CSS/JavaScript) Experienced Interaction Designer - 5+ Years {http://careers.bloomberg.com/hire/jobs/job32174.html} UX Prototypers - CTO Office {http://careers.bloomberg.com/hire/jobs/job32194.html} Visual GUI Designers - 5+ years {http://careers.bloomberg.com/hire/jobs/job32187.html} *TECHNOLOGY* Computer Systems Security Architects - CTO Office (8+ Years) {http://careers.bloomberg.com/hire/jobs/job32196.html} Web Infrastructure Architect {http://careers.bloomberg.com/hire/jobs/job32207.html} Experienced C++ Developer (8+ Years) - CTO UI Technology Research {http://careers.bloomberg.com/hire/jobs/job30037.html} Senior C/C++ Open Source Developer (5+ Years) - CTO Office {http://careers.bloomberg.com/hire/jobs/job32190.html} Open Source Moderator & Administrator - CTO Office {http://careers.bloomberg.com/hire/jobs/job32195.html}

Archived News 2011

Need research study participants?

2011-11-28

If you need research study participants, bear in mind that students enrolled in Professor Smith-Jackson\'s ISE 4644 class are required to participate in 2 research studies during the fall semester (or write a paper as a substitute). If you or your fellow graduate students are in need of research participants, please contact Professor Smith-Jackson (see below) and she will disseminate the information on the class listserv.


Tonya L. Smith-Jackson, PhD, CPE, Professor

Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics

Grado Dept. of Industrial and Systems Engineering


Phone: 540-231-4119; Fax: 540-231-3322

www.ace.ise.vt.edu, smithjack@vt.edu

Summer 2012 Internships IBM

2011-11-07

The User Systems & Experience Research (USER) group at IBM Research - Almaden in San Jose, California is accepting applications for interns for the summer of 2012. The USER group focuses on understanding and improving how people interact with technology. We analyze existing practices, build new interactive technologies, and study their impact on real users, often in the field. Our cross-disciplinary team is comprised of human computer interaction researchers and software engineers with backgrounds in computer science, psychology, social science, design, and user experience.

Our current research focuses include improving collaboration within the enterprise, enhancing browser-based user experiences, interaction with multiple computing devices, user experiences for mobile devices, and user-centered visual analytics. We seek interns with backgrounds in computer science, cognitive science, sociology, and design. Applicants must be enrolled in a Ph.D. program.

To apply for an internship, send an email to csjobs_user at almaden.ibm.com:

(1) With a subject-line "USER summer intern 2012 application"

(2) Attaching your CV, and

(3) Including the following information in the body text of the email:

(a) A few keywords describing your current research and research area (e.g., CSCW, info viz, end-user-programming, experimental psychology).

(b) A few keywords describing your HCI research skills (e.g., strong programmer, quantitative data analysis, experimental design, visual design).

(c) The name and email address of your Ph.D. advisor.

Applications sent to csjobs_user at almaden.ibm.com will be considered for all USER research projects. If you know which project you are interested in, you are encouraged to send an email with the above information to the contact person for that individual project (listed below) -- your application will still be considered for all USER projects. Please do not send your application directly to multiple project teams.

IBM is committed to creating a diverse environment and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, national origin, genetics, disability, age, or veteran status.

USER Research Areas Recruiting Interns

Social & Collaboration Research

We are exploring the use of social and collaboration software within and among businesses and their customers, including tools for communities, teams, social networks, and collective intelligence groups.

* Understanding social and workplace collaboration: Conducting studies to understand fundamental issues about how people collaborate in companies and how social and collaboration software can help.

* User, team, and community modeling: Designing and developing empirical and computational models to characterize individual and group behavior and traits from collaboration tool usage data (e.g., emails, teamspaces, microblogs). We are leveraging these models to improve the user experience and value of these tools.

* Engaging social networks to collect hidden information, verify questionable information, or take action. This includes building smart dashboards and automated algorithms to facilitate engagement, and conducting user studies to explore the applications that may be enabled through engagement.

Team: Hernan Badenes, Hongxia Jin, Tara Matthews, Tom Moran, Jeff Nichols, Barton Smith, Wei Zhang, Tom Zimmerman Contact: Tara Matthews (tlmatthe at us.ibm.com)

Smarter Web: Conversational interfaces for the web We are looking for summer internship applicants interested in conversational interaction with intelligent assistants. Our CoScripter system (coscripter.researchlabs.ibm.com) enables end users to automate web-based activities, such as checking in for a flight, paying a monthly credit card bill, or finding a local store's business hours. We are extending this system to enable conversations with a mobile user to handle variations in a scripted activity, such as number of checked bags, unexpected credit card charges, or changes in a business' web page. Applicants should have an interest in web-based declarative task modeling and dialog management, or contextual language understanding and generation, with experience in web development.

Team: Julian Cerruti, Allen Cypher, Clemens Drews, Tessa Lau, Jalal Mahmud, Jeff Nichols Contact: Tessa Lau (tessalau at us.ibm.com)

Mobile User Experience Research

The current set of user experiences and user interfaces for mobile devices just scratch the surface. We're interested in exploring new techniques to allow users to interact with smart phones and tablets (particularly new techniques for rich interactions with visualized information) and new use cases and user experiences for mobile devices (particularly how mobile user experiences can effectively integrate with desktop user experiences, either serially or in parallel). We are looking for internship candidates who are interested in pushing the boundaries of interaction for mobile devices to create compelling next-generation experiences. Experience with mobile development, mobile evaluation, or interactive visualization is preferred.

Team: Chris Kau, Jeff Pierce, Christine Robson, Jerre Schoudt Contact: Jeff Pierce (jspierce at us.ibm.com)

User-Centered Visual Analytics

This line of work involves researching and developing visual analytic paradigms, tools, and methodologies to support task and goal-driven decision making. We are addressing several research issues:

* Design and develop interactive visual metaphors and tools to transform text collections into a visual representation that helps reveal thematic patterns and locate interesting information.

* Devise interactive analytics algorithms and approaches to support guided interactive discovery, visualization, and collaboration on data leveraging data semantics, meta-data, and analytic tasks.

* Model, represent, and translate a person's high-level analytic intent to the underlying, operational, analytic steps.

Overall, we aim to support users in their decision making in domains such as retail and healthcare. We aim to do so by a) designing novel visual metaphors and interaction techniques to convey complex text analytic results and make them consumable by average users; b) seamlessly integrating interactive visualization with analytics techniques to drive and guide visual analysis, tailoring the analysis process to a persons tasks; and c) leveraging data semantics in the representation of and interaction with data, guiding and summarizing visualizations by automatically detecting and explaining interesting observations in plain language.

Team: Eben Haber, Eser Kandogan, Huahai Yang Contact: Eser Kandogan (eser at us.ibm.com)

For more information, visit the USER group website: http://www.almaden.ibm.com/cs/disciplines/user/

Summer 2012 Internships IBM

2011-11-07

The User Systems & Experience Research (USER) group at IBM Research - Almaden in San Jose, California is accepting applications for interns for the summer of 2012. The USER group focuses on understanding and improving how people interact with technology. We analyze existing practices, build new interactive technologies, and study their impact on real users, often in the field. Our cross-disciplinary team is comprised of human computer interaction researchers and software engineers with backgrounds in computer science, psychology, social science, design, and user experience.

Our current research focuses include improving collaboration within the enterprise, enhancing browser-based user experiences, interaction with multiple computing devices, user experiences for mobile devices, and user-centered visual analytics. We seek interns with backgrounds in computer science, cognitive science, sociology, and design. Applicants must be enrolled in a Ph.D. program.

To apply for an internship, send an email to csjobs_user at almaden.ibm.com:

(1) With a subject-line "USER summer intern 2012 application"

(2) Attaching your CV, and

(3) Including the following information in the body text of the email:

(a) A few keywords describing your current research and research area (e.g., CSCW, info viz, end-user-programming, experimental psychology).

(b) A few keywords describing your HCI research skills (e.g., strong programmer, quantitative data analysis, experimental design, visual design).

(c) The name and email address of your Ph.D. advisor.

Applications sent to csjobs_user at almaden.ibm.com will be considered for all USER research projects. If you know which project you are interested in, you are encouraged to send an email with the above information to the contact person for that individual project (listed below) -- your application will still be considered for all USER projects. Please do not send your application directly to multiple project teams.

IBM is committed to creating a diverse environment and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, national origin, genetics, disability, age, or veteran status.

USER Research Areas Recruiting Interns

Social & Collaboration Research We are exploring the use of social and collaboration software within and among businesses and their customers, including tools for communities, teams, social networks, and collective intelligence groups. * Understanding social and workplace collaboration: Conducting studies to understand fundamental issues about how people collaborate in companies and how social and collaboration software can help. * User, team, and community modeling: Designing and developing empirical and computational models to characterize individual and group behavior and traits from collaboration tool usage data (e.g., emails, teamspaces, microblogs). We are leveraging these models to improve the user experience and value of these tools. * Engaging social networks to collect hidden information, verify questionable information, or take action. This includes building smart dashboards and automated algorithms to facilitate engagement, and conducting user studies to explore the applications that may be enabled through engagement. Team: Hernan Badenes, Hongxia Jin, Tara Matthews, Tom Moran, Jeff Nichols, Barton Smith, Wei Zhang, Tom Zimmerman Contact: Tara Matthews (tlmatthe at us.ibm.com) Smarter Web: Conversational interfaces for the web We are looking for summer internship applicants interested in conversational interaction with intelligent assistants. Our CoScripter system (coscripter.researchlabs.ibm.com) enables end users to automate web-based activities, such as checking in for a flight, paying a monthly credit card bill, or finding a local store's business hours. We are extending this system to enable conversations with a mobile user to handle variations in a scripted activity, such as number of checked bags, unexpected credit card charges, or changes in a business' web page. Applicants should have an interest in web-based declarative task modeling and dialog management, or contextual language understanding and generation, with experience in web development. Team: Julian Cerruti, Allen Cypher, Clemens Drews, Tessa Lau, Jalal Mahmud, Jeff Nichols Contact: Tessa Lau (tessalau at us.ibm.com) Mobile User Experience Research The current set of user experiences and user interfaces for mobile devices just scratch the surface. We're interested in exploring new techniques to allow users to interact with smart phones and tablets (particularly new techniques for rich interactions with visualized information) and new use cases and user experiences for mobile devices (particularly how mobile user experiences can effectively integrate with desktop user experiences, either serially or in parallel). We are looking for internship candidates who are interested in pushing the boundaries of interaction for mobile devices to create compelling next-generation experiences. Experience with mobile development, mobile evaluation, or interactive visualization is preferred. Team: Chris Kau, Jeff Pierce, Christine Robson, Jerre Schoudt Contact: Jeff Pierce (jspierce at us.ibm.com) User-Centered Visual Analytics This line of work involves researching and developing visual analytic paradigms, tools, and methodologies to support task and goal-driven decision making. We are addressing several research issues: * Design and develop interactive visual metaphors and tools to transform text collections into a visual representation that helps reveal thematic patterns and locate interesting information. * Devise interactive analytics algorithms and approaches to support guided interactive discovery, visualization, and collaboration on data leveraging data semantics, meta-data, and analytic tasks. * Model, represent, and translate a person's high-level analytic intent to the underlying, operational, analytic steps. Overall, we aim to support users in their decision making in domains such as retail and healthcare. We aim to do so by a) designing novel visual metaphors and interaction techniques to convey complex text analytic results and make them consumable by average users; b) seamlessly integrating interactive visualization with analytics techniques to drive and guide visual analysis, tailoring the analysis process to a persons tasks; and c) leveraging data semantics in the representation of and interaction with data, guiding and summarizing visualizations by automatically detecting and explaining interesting observations in plain language. Team: Eben Haber, Eser Kandogan, Huahai Yang Contact: Eser Kandogan (eser at us.ibm.com) For more information, visit the USER group website: http://www.almaden.ibm.com/cs/disciplines/user/ Jeff Pierce, Ph.D. Manager, Mobile Computing Research IBM Research - Almaden San Jose, CA 95120

Summer 2012 Internships IBM

2011-11-07

The User Systems & Experience Research (USER) group at IBM Research - Almaden in San Jose, California is accepting applications for interns for the summer of 2012. The USER group focuses on understanding and improving how people interact with technology. We analyze existing practices, build new interactive technologies, and study their impact on real users, often in the field. Our cross-disciplinary team is comprised of human computer interaction researchers and software engineers with backgrounds in computer science, psychology, social science, design, and user experience. Our current research focuses include improving collaboration within the enterprise, enhancing browser-based user experiences, interaction with multiple computing devices, user experiences for mobile devices, and user-centered visual analytics. We seek interns with backgrounds in computer science, cognitive science, sociology, and design. Applicants must be enrolled in a Ph.D. program. To apply for an internship, send an email to csjobs_user at almaden.ibm.com: (1) With a subject-line "USER summer intern 2012 application" (2) Attaching your CV, and (3) Including the following information in the body text of the email: (a) A few keywords describing your current research and research area (e.g., CSCW, info viz, end-user-programming, experimental psychology). (b) A few keywords describing your HCI research skills (e.g., strong programmer, quantitative data analysis, experimental design, visual design). (c) The name and email address of your Ph.D. advisor. Applications sent to csjobs_user at almaden.ibm.com will be considered for all USER research projects. If you know which project you are interested in, you are encouraged to send an email with the above information to the contact person for that individual project (listed below) -- your application will still be considered for all USER projects. Please do not send your application directly to multiple project teams. IBM is committed to creating a diverse environment and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, national origin, genetics, disability, age, or veteran status. USER Research Areas Recruiting Interns Social & Collaboration Research We are exploring the use of social and collaboration software within and among businesses and their customers, including tools for communities, teams, social networks, and collective intelligence groups. * Understanding social and workplace collaboration: Conducting studies to understand fundamental issues about how people collaborate in companies and how social and collaboration software can help. * User, team, and community modeling: Designing and developing empirical and computational models to characterize individual and group behavior and traits from collaboration tool usage data (e.g., emails, teamspaces, microblogs). We are leveraging these models to improve the user experience and value of these tools. * Engaging social networks to collect hidden information, verify questionable information, or take action. This includes building smart dashboards and automated algorithms to facilitate engagement, and conducting user studies to explore the applications that may be enabled through engagement. Team: Hernan Badenes, Hongxia Jin, Tara Matthews, Tom Moran, Jeff Nichols, Barton Smith, Wei Zhang, Tom Zimmerman Contact: Tara Matthews (tlmatthe at us.ibm.com) Smarter Web: Conversational interfaces for the web We are looking for summer internship applicants interested in conversational interaction with intelligent assistants. Our CoScripter system (coscripter.researchlabs.ibm.com) enables end users to automate web-based activities, such as checking in for a flight, paying a monthly credit card bill, or finding a local store's business hours. We are extending this system to enable conversations with a mobile user to handle variations in a scripted activity, such as number of checked bags, unexpected credit card charges, or changes in a business' web page. Applicants should have an interest in web-based declarative task modeling and dialog management, or contextual language understanding and generation, with experience in web development. Team: Julian Cerruti, Allen Cypher, Clemens Drews, Tessa Lau, Jalal Mahmud, Jeff Nichols Contact: Tessa Lau (tessalau at us.ibm.com) Mobile User Experience Research The current set of user experiences and user interfaces for mobile devices just scratch the surface. We're interested in exploring new techniques to allow users to interact with smart phones and tablets (particularly new techniques for rich interactions with visualized information) and new use cases and user experiences for mobile devices (particularly how mobile user experiences can effectively integrate with desktop user experiences, either serially or in parallel). We are looking for internship candidates who are interested in pushing the boundaries of interaction for mobile devices to create compelling next-generation experiences. Experience with mobile development, mobile evaluation, or interactive visualization is preferred. Team: Chris Kau, Jeff Pierce, Christine Robson, Jerre Schoudt Contact: Jeff Pierce (jspierce at us.ibm.com) User-Centered Visual Analytics This line of work involves researching and developing visual analytic paradigms, tools, and methodologies to support task and goal-driven decision making. We are addressing several research issues: * Design and develop interactive visual metaphors and tools to transform text collections into a visual representation that helps reveal thematic patterns and locate interesting information. * Devise interactive analytics algorithms and approaches to support guided interactive discovery, visualization, and collaboration on data leveraging data semantics, meta-data, and analytic tasks. * Model, represent, and translate a person's high-level analytic intent to the underlying, operational, analytic steps. Overall, we aim to support users in their decision making in domains such as retail and healthcare. We aim to do so by a) designing novel visual metaphors and interaction techniques to convey complex text analytic results and make them consumable by average users; b) seamlessly integrating interactive visualization with analytics techniques to drive and guide visual analysis, tailoring the analysis process to a persons tasks; and c) leveraging data semantics in the representation of and interaction with data, guiding and summarizing visualizations by automatically detecting and explaining interesting observations in plain language. Team: Eben Haber, Eser Kandogan, Huahai Yang Contact: Eser Kandogan (eser at us.ibm.com) For more information, visit the USER group website: http://www.almaden.ibm.com/cs/disciplines/user/ Jeff Pierce, Ph.D. Manager, Mobile Computing Research IBM Research - Almaden San Jose, CA 95120

Interested in a Coding Commons?

2011-10-27

In HCI research, many of us occasionally have the need to review and code qualitative research data, such as videos or surveys. Often it is possible for us to review our own research data, but we face the risk of our personal biases affecting our judgments. Other times, the type of judgment may be inherently subjective and can therefore benefit from multiple coders. Our CHCI has the benefit of having a large number of students; we could pool our time and share our experience in a "Coding Commons," a community of students who agree to trade coding time. Students could donate time to others who need help reviewing data. In return, students will receive help with their own projects. Please email Eric Ragan (eragan12@vt.edu) if this sounds like an idea that could benefit you and you might be interested in participating.

HCI Open House Friday September 30, 2011

2011-09-20

The HCI Center will host an Open House from 4 pm to 6 pm on Friday, September 30, 2011 for the Virginia Tech community. HCI Center faculty and students will demonstrate research projects and guide tours of their labs. Location: Knowledge Works II, first floor, 2202 Kraft Drive, Blacksburg.

HCI Open House Friday September 30, 2011

2011-09-20

Open House from 4 pm to 6 pm on Friday, September 30, 2011 for the Virginia Tech community. HCI Center faculty and students will demonstrate research projects and guide tours of their labs. Location: Knowledge Works II, first floor, 2202 Kraft Drive, Blacksburg." rows="5" cols="60">The HCI Center will host an Open House from 4 pm to 6 pm on Friday, September 30, 2011 for the Virginia Tech community. HCI Center faculty and students will demonstrate research projects and guide tours of their labs. Location: Knowledge Works II, first floor, 2202 Kraft Drive, Blacksburg.

Discussion with Prof. Ben Knapp

2011-09-15

Join us Friday, September 16, at GLC Room C (12:30 - 1:30 pm) for brown bag lunch and discussion with Prof. Ben Knapp, the new director of the Institute for Creativity, Art and Technology, following his CS Seminar.

Summer REU Symposium

2011-08-24

Students participating the HCI Summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program supported by the National Science Foundation present posters or demonstrations of their research projects. July 17, 2011; Room 1110 Knowledge Works II.

Anamary Leal and Greg Wilson, 2010 Recipients of NSF Graduat

2011-02-22

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship is a very prestigious fellowship awarded by the National Science Foundation. It provides funding for up to 3 years, at the rate of ,000 for every 12 month period. While the fellowship is *extremely* competitive, the HCI Center has had several students receive this award. Anamary Leal, advised by Dr. Doug Bowman and Greg Wilson, advised by Dr. Scott McCrickard were both recipients in 2010. Other recipients include Ricardo Quintana-Castillo (2008, advised by Dr. Manuel Perez-Quinones), Ashley Robinson (2007, advised by Dr. Francis Quek), Meg Dickey-Kurdziolek (2006, advised by Dr. Deborah Tatar)

Archived News 2010

CS Education Week

2010-12-08

This week is CS Education Week! http://www.csedweek.org/ See https://www.cs.vt.edu/CSEdWeek for some local angles, including an invitation to add a pin to a map showing where you first programmed a computer - please participate. Thanks to Edgardo Vega for setting this up!

Annual VTURCS Symposium

2010-05-07

Our annual Virginia Tech Undergraduate Research in Computer Science (VTURCS) Symposium took place on April 28th with 18 students presenting 13 different projects. Almost 100 people attended the event, including students, faculty, administrators, and industry representatives. Faculty members Dr. Barbara Ryder, Dr. Denis Gracanin, and Dr. Anil Vullikanti selected the Faculty Choice winners. Representatives from the departments Computer Science Resources Consortium (CSRC) -- IBM (Alex Shaffer) and Rackspace (Bill Boebel and Basharat Wani) -- were present and helped us select the winners of the Industry Choice awards. Prizes and awards were generously donated and supported by all of our CSRC members. This years awardees and more information are listed at: http://vturcs.cs.vt.edu/spring10

Disney Research is sponsoring a design competition...

2010-04-28

...as part of this summer's SigGraph conference. The Learning Challenge at SIGGRAPH 2010 is an open competition sponsored by Disney Research with the goal of finding new and creative ways to use technology to make learning fun for children. Based on the principle that fun and learning should not be contradictory, teams are asked to develop an engaging, computer-based learning application that will delight, inspire, and reveal key learning concepts for children ages 7-11. The competition is open to individuals or teams (from collegiate students working with faculty advisors to working professionals) who must submit work by 7 June 2010. Twenty finalists will receive travel grants of ,500 per team and free SIGGRAPH 2010 registration. The winners will be announced 28 July at SIGGRAPH 2010 in Los Angeles and will be eligible to receive a ,000 cash prize, Disney R&D Tours, Disney Animation Tours, and Walt Disney Studio Tours. For complete details, visit www.learningchallenge2010.com

Apply for the first Startl Design Boost - Applications Open

2010-02-13

The first Startl Design Boost (http://startl.org/programs-2/design-boost/) is a five day building, hacking, business and human centered design immersion to be held at the Pratt Institute in New York City, March 15-19, 2010.

Archived News 2009

REU Symposium July 16, 2009

2009-07-20

all of the summer REU students presented posters of their summer research projects in McBryde 106--the Undergraduate Learning Center. Click on More News for excerpts from proceedings.

Excerpt from proceedings distributed at the REU symposium

2009-07-20


Field Study of In-use Information Security and Interfaces within Childcare
Presenters: Tom DeHart (University of Rutgers-Camden)
Advisors: Laurian Vega, Steve Harrison, Dennis Kafura

AlgoViz.org: An Online Educational Community for Algorithm Visualizations
Presenter: Jonathan Park (Carnegie Mellon University)
Advisors: Clifford A. Shaffer, Stephen H. Edwards, Alexander Joel D. Alon, Monika Akbar

Graphical User Interface Design: Interfacing the Future of Home Controls
Presenter: Erik J. Irvin-Williams, Tavon D. Gatling (Norfolk State University)
Advisor: Dennis Gracanin

Pic-Up: A Tool for Collaborative Storyboarding
Presenter: Lulu Hu (Wellesley College), Joe Degol (Penn State University, Altoona)
Advisors: Shahtab Wahid, Scott McCrickard

Hyper-drama storytelling authoring tool
Presenter: Fabrice Marcelin (Virginia Tech/ESIH)
Advisors: Francis Quek, Ashley Robinson

Visualizing Temporary Objects in Java Applications
Presenter: Luke Marrs (Virginia Tech)
Advisors: Marc Fisher II, Barbara Ryder

VizBlog: From Java to Flash Deployment
Presenter: Joralis Sanchez Sola (University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez)
Advisors: Manuel Perez, Andrea Kavanaugh

The Making of L2Ork: The Virginia Tech Linux Laptop Orchestra
Presenter: Maya Renfro (VT), Andy Wood (University of Rochester), Michael Matthews (VT)
Advisors: Ico Bukvic

GPU-Accelerated Isosurface Volume Rendering
Presenter: olin Braley (Virginia Tech)
Advisors: Yong Cao, Denis Gracanin, Robert Hagan (UNC)

iPhone Application Development in Server-Client Communications
Presenter: Arthur Billingsley, Felicia Osborne, Roosevelt Cooper (Norfolk State University)
Advisors: Denis Gracinin, Ji-Sun Kim, Samah Gad, Felicia Doswell (NSU)

Social Network Sites
Presenter:Cesar E. Concepcion-Acevedo (University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez)
Advisors: Andrea Kavanaugh, Manuel Perez

Sonification as a Tool for Optimizing Software Configuration
Presenter: Andrew Wood (University of Rochester)
Advisors: Cody Hethorne, Pardha Pyla, Eli Tilevich, Ico Bukvic

Evaluating dynamic program representations for blended analysis
Presenter: Shrutarshi Basu (Lafayette College)
Advisors: Dr. Marc Fisher II, Dr. Barbara Ryder

Science in RAP (Recording and Audio Production): Leveraging Interest in Music Production Arts for Teaching STEM
Presenter: Phoebe Bakanas (Connecticut College)
Advisors: Dan Dunlap, Andrea Kavanaugh

Creating a visual survey tool and database for a non-profit organization: An Agile Usability approach
Presenter:Bernadel Benoit, Mario Calixte, Sherley Codio, Jennifer Francois (Virginia Tech/ESIH)
Advisors: Jeremy Barskdale, Scott McCrickard

Evaluation of a concept mapping approach used to improve team interaction in agile usability
Presenter: Sherley Codio, Jennifer Francois, Benoit Bernadel, Mario Calixte (Virginia Tech/ESIH)
Advisors: Jeremy Barskdale, Scott McCrickard

Testing

2009-03-24

Lots of goodies...

New website

2009-01-19

The CHCI website is up and working. There are many new sections to the site, including a listing of alumni, internships, and existing students. We are planning on adding support for many new interesting features, such as support for Web 2.0 sites and even access from iPhones. Keep an eye on the site and let us know what you think.

Fluid 960 Grid System, created by Stephen Bau, based on the 960 Grid System by Nathan Smith. Released under the GPL / MIT Licenses.